Together for Better Africulture

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The Africultures Festival, held at Wyatt Park, Lidcombe almost didn’t go ahead this year. Why isn’t exactly clear. But thank goodness it did because the one-day event was full of sunshine, music, colour and a cheerful atmosphere that was contagious… even if you were there for work – which was the case for some of the Family Mental Health Support Service (FMHSS) Team at Woodville Alliance.

So why did we get involved in the 2017 Africultures Festival in March?

“To celebrate and appreciate the cultural richness of the African community, understand and raise awareness of African traditions and cultural practices within our local community and engage with community members to hear their stories and views on wellbeing,” said Hoda, the FMHSS Manager.

The Life Foundation, like Woodville Alliance, also set up an information stall at the festival. The Life Foundation supports 298 orphaned children by giving all funds from their sold products back to the foundation and orphaned children across Africa.

Mercy from The Life Foundation
Mercy from The Life Foundation

The Africultures Festival is the largest annual celebration of African culture in Australia. The array of dress, talent, culinary delights and community-focused organisations on the day was dazzling.

Among some of the more than 30 performances and activities on the day were:

  • Africultures Literature Hour
  • Afro Hair Forum
  • Africultures Soccer Tournament
  • Africultures Fashion Parade
  • Igbo Community of Australia Women’s Group
  • Berias Masseque and The Afro-Fusion Band
  • Lisa Viola
Lisa Viola. Credit: Africultures
Lisa Viola. Credit: Africultures

Apart from the fun on offer, why is the Africultures Festival an important event? Kimberly Ray – organiser of the festival’s Literature Hour explains.

For musician Berias, this year’s festival has been the biggest and the best. “I don’t know why,” he said. “Maybe because there’s even more people.”

Berias Masseque and The Afro-Fusion Band. Left to right: Sam, Berias, Bryce and Brendan.
Berias Masseque and The Afro-Fusion Band. Left to right: Sam, Berias, Bryce and Brendan.

The colouring-in corner at the Woodville Alliance stand was a hit with the little ones.

Little Donald at the Woodville Alliance Information Stall, colouring in with Woodville Alliance FMHSS Team Member, Daniel.
Little Donald at the Woodville Alliance Information Stall, colouring in with Woodville Alliance FMHSS Team Member, Daniel.
A girl in traditional costume.
A girl in traditional costume.

Woodville Alliance is a non-government community organisation. We have programs that support young people through positive mental health interventions and programs, school-based activities for children transitioning from primary to high school, a community centre for adults that live in and around South West Sydney, a disabilities/NDIS team, a child-care centre and humanitarian support for newly arrived families.

To find out more, call us on (02) 9722 5200.

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